Washington DC Part Two – 2018

  • Post last modified:September 24, 2020

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Washington DC Part Two

This is a post about the second part of our trip. Washington DC Part Two is about additional sight-seeing, including the US Capitol.

Personal Issue

Last post brought up the mother of all bloody noses. Ended up in the Emergency Department of Washington Hospital Center. Here is a link to the Hospital. As a result, Thursday became a very quiet day with thoughts of going home earlier. Because we had planned the trip and I felt better on Friday, decided to stay. Certainly didn’t feel the greatest but mostly could see the museums and just not talk very much. Now we are staying, nose packing and all! Washington DC Part Two continues! (Besides, it was cool and raining all day Thursday.)

Back up to Air and Space Museum

This is from Washington DC Part One, not Washington DC Part Two.

Here is a link to a video showing the air traffic control system shutting down all air traffic over the US on 9-11. (The video quality could be better but it’s important so included it.)

Therefore, we go back to Washington DC Part Two.

US Capitol

Preface

Several months before arrival, we made application to visit the White House, the Capitol and the FBI. We didn’t get approval for the FBI. (I think they found out about me!) As a result, today is the day for the US Capitol! My first event after my traumatic health issue, continuing our Washington DC Part Two.

US Capitol visit

Call Uber about one hour early.  Takes about 20 minutes to get there. But the Congressman’s office had Schwann’s Ice Cream! (If you aren’t a Minnesota resident, you probably don’t know about them. Trying to buy our vote?)

On with the Capitol tour

We met our tour leader, a member of our Congressman’s staff. In addition, we meet the other tour members. A couple from Maple Grove and a couple from Brooklyn Park. Another gentleman formerly worked for the Congressman and he brought two friends. Finally, after the obligatory introductions, we head out. Furthermore, there are tunnels to the Capitol from the House and Senate offices but it’s a beautiful day so we go outside.

Pictures and tour information
Washington DC Part Two
US Capitol building from the House side. The small shelter to the right of the path is used for House members and Senators for interviews held outside.
Capitol statues
The Statue of Freedom, the prominent view when entering the Capitol. The design of the statue occurred in the years leading up to the Civil War. The decision makers considered three different designs. The first one had the statue wearing a peace symbol on her head. Most noteworthy is the main dissenter was Jefferson Davis who was a US Senator from Mississippi prior to the secession of the Southern states.
Continue with pictures from the Capitol
US Capitol Statuary Hall
Maria L. Sanford. One of two representatives of Minnesota with a statue in the Statuary Hall in the US Capitol. Two statues are allowed for each state with approval by the Joint House and Senate Committee for the Library of Congress. Furthermore, these statues may be removed and replaced when requested by the state and approved by the committee. At this date, Mississippi has not requested the removal of Jefferson Davis who was a US Senator prior to the Civil War.
Abraham Lincoln in US Capitol Statuary Hall
This prominent bust of Lincoln is not requested by the state but is in this hall due to his national contribution.
US Capitol dome painting
The painting on the dome of the US Capitol The man in blue in the inner ring is George Washington and shows the high regard so many had for him.

Here is a link to an article that gives much more detail about this painting.

Minnesota Statue at US Capitol
This is the other statue from Minnesota. Henry Mower Rice.

Henry Mower Rice is a key person in Minnesota history. Rather than try to explain it, here is a link to information about him.

Rosa Parks
Rather than submitted by a state, Rosa Parks was by the committee that oversees the hall with urging from civil rights groups. Consequently, her statue was created with an angry look on her face and staring at Jefferson Davis.
Women's Rights statue in Statue Hall US Capitol
Statue dedicated to women’s rights. The statue depicts from left to right: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott. The fourth block was left incomplete because women’s rights are still not complete.
Kansas Entry to Statue Hall - Dwight D. Eisenhower
One of Kansas’s entry into the Statue Hall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th President of the United States.
Wrap up

Because more information is obtained than anticipated, we leave the post as is and move on to Washington DC Part Three. Next up, Museum of American History, the International Spy Museum and the Newseum.

The Driveby Tourist

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